The Cities Creating The Most High-paid Jobs, And Why They’re Good For Low-wage Workers Too

“Fortunately, U.S. workers are in a very good position to win that race.” The study, however, makes some rosy assumptions about the spillover effects for states not directly involved in hydraulic fracturing, or fracking. The practice is vigorously opposed by environmental groups, which have fought to restrain or ban the activity in environmentally friendly states. New Yorkwhich http://www.firstpost.com/economy/campa-cola-mess-why-occupation-certificate-is-so-crucial-1229187.html currently has a moratorium on the processand California are among those the study said would see an upswing in jobs and revenue associated with natural gas exporting. Future of LNG Scott Darling, regional head of oil and gas research, J.P. Morgan, says uncertainty over the timing of Japan nuclear restarts could boost LNG demand.

For the metros at the top of this list, the large share of high-wage jobs is a byproduct of their high cost of living compared to the national average. But its also related to their highly skilled, well-educated workforces. In the government-driven D.C. metro area , more than 25 percent of new jobs since 2009 (as well as a quarter of projected new jobs from 2013 to 2017) have come in occupations that pay $40 or more per hour. Thats a staggering number of high-wage jobs, many of which are clustered among finance, computer, and professional services occupations management analysts, software developers, financial analysts, interpreters and translators, et al. The share of new $40-an-hour jobs since 2009 is slightly smaller in Boston and Seattle. In the last four years, though, both metros have added more than 6,000 software developer jobs with median wages of around $50 an hour locally. Its these type of high-skill, hard-to-fill occupations that will drive high-wage growth as the economy continues to stabilize. And as more of these high-wage jobs are created, more entry-level opportunities will arise for less-skilled workers.

Fukushima operator TEPCO to cut 1,000 more jobs: newspaper

This reduction was estimated to have been already achieved through increases in early retirement and restraint on new recruitment, the report said. TEPCO will propose the new plan to slash more than 1,000 jobs between April and September next year to its labour unions shortly, Nikkei said. The new job cut programme will be incorporated in an updated business turnaround plan to be compiled in December, the daily said. A massive earthquake and tsunami in March 2011 ravaged the Fukushima plant’s cooling system, sparking a reactor meltdown in the world’s worst nuclear accident since the 1986 Chernobyl disaster. TEPCO has been effectively nationalised by a huge injection of public cash to help it survive the vast costs of the clean-up at Fukushima. Business Another milestone is passing in America’s racial journey: The next mayor of New York City is a white man with a black wife.

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